Sunday, June 28, 2009

Pulai Tree

What can be seen in a jungle? This is kind of stupid question. In this rainforest at Cerok Tokun, giant aged trees with perimeter of more than the arm-span of two men can be found scattering here and there along the hiking trail.

This tree which has been my closer friend recently and starred in my previous posts are named Pulai Tree. I dare to declare openly only since I learnt their name from local newspaper last week. (You are not going to show your mum your girl friend without first getting known her name, aren't you?)

I am fond of elderly trees, not only they have been rambling to me decades long of history, they also show the kind of sturdy and rugged shape which cannot be matched by a young one. This is the beauty of an oldie, like me.

In the other hand, besides being benevolent enough to serve as a helpful staircase along the trail, its vine is always a good friend indeed for us to hold the balance or to pull ourselves up from the steep slope during the hike.

(Many places in Malaysia are named after a variety of trees. Simpang Pulai has been better known since the launching of the highway that takes us from Ipoh to Cameron Highland easily. Pinang of Pulau Pinang, or Penang Island, is the Malay word for Betel Nut or areca nut. A small village which is nearby to where I live is called Nyior Satu Batang, or A piece of Coconut tree. My familiar Mengkuang Dam is the same whereby Mengkuang is actually one type of tree. There are many more such examples).

10 comments:

Bangchik and Kakdah said...

I love pulai tree..., The tree at younger age, spring up in stages, and the tree resemble pagoda.

~ bangchik

Ginnymo said...

Quite the root system on those trees. Be careful you don't stumble over them..ha!

Icy BC said...

Older trees have so much more history than young ones, and you're so right in your sentiment.

The Retired One said...

I LOVE the large trees and especially their many, many roots.
Roots are what ground all of us, after all...right?

rainfield61 said...

Bangchik and Kakdah: I read about its resemblance to a pagoda, but I see no pagoda during my hike. Hahaha...

Ginnymo: You are right, I have stumbled a few times. It is normal, not only to small kids, but also to an old me like me.

Icy BC: Then you will expect more stories from me, aren't you? LOL.

The Retired One: I see their roots crawling not only downward, but also up along the slope. Very funny. Why don't they look for an easy way?

Sharkbytes said...

So many different plants there! Yes, places here are often named for kinds of trees, too, but usually after they've been cut down... like a housing development named Aspen Ridge.

Mei Teng said...

I have to admit I don't know much about the local botanics. When it comes to huge giant trees, the redwood comes to mind.

Ratty said...

This all makes me wonder how many other places are named after trees. Now I want to find out if there is any place near me like that.

rainfield61 said...

Sharkbytes: Rainforest is rich in trees, giant trees that act as oxygen tanks.

Mei Teng: Me too, but start to catch up bit by bit. Anyhow, I love all the trees because of the reason they take in our CO2 but return us with O2.

Ratty: Then, I shall wait to see something from you. Am I right? Hahaha..

betchai said...

i love elderly trees too, and the more twisted they are, it seems they speak of deeper character too.